Social media vs happiness

Bare Organics

I had a post lined up about the mental load, but then this Mumsnet thread blew up on social media last night and it felt relevant to say a few words about it. (Also that mental load post really wasn’t working for me so hurrah for a diversion.)

The crux of it – if you don’t want to waste an hour or two of your life reading increasingly snippy and personal comments on an internet forum – is that some people are getting fed up of Instamums. I’m paraphrasing here, but several people are taking umbrage at those with tons of followers, sitting in their Farrow & Ball painted houses, getting loads of free holidays and goodies in return for sticking a few pics up on Instagram and selling out to brands.

Some valid points are raised about the transparency of which posts are ads, what products have been gifted, whether holidays are paid for and whether the authenticity of what is being posted can be trusted as much as when they had fewer followers. Digital advertising is changing. Sometimes the waters are murky and not every influencer is open about what they receive. I feel the particular women who are getting slated in this thread ARE pretty open (after a career in media I can read between the lines but maybe not everyone can) and people have to accept that this is their business now. If they are a successful influencer, why not make a career of it?

Like any job, it takes work. Getting those insta-worthy pics is time-consuming, they will often hire photographers, pics need a certain amount of editing to maintain the look and feel of an account, you have to write decent copy to go with it and I’m certain they turn down way more brands than they actually feature. But I’m not writing this to comment on the digital advertising industry.

Unfortunately much of what was said smacked of jealousy and unhappiness.

I agree that sometime when a person takes on a lot of brand work, it makes them less interesting. I stopped looking at one particular account because her new direction wasn’t really my bag. Not because she was doing ads, just that I realised our fashion sense wasn’t quite the same after all. Yes, I found it a bit dull that a couple of big brands seemed to supply most of her current wardrobe but hey, we all have different tastes. I felt her earlier appeal was muted because she posted less about what she was actually buying but her posts were clearly marked as collaborations so I didn’t feel cheated. Not everyone feels the same.

What interested me about this thread is that the accounts of a certain group of women (many of whom I follow too) have made others feel pushed out. There has been talk of ‘Mean Girls’ behaviour, making the less insta-gifted among us feel like they aren’t in the cool gang, a sense of ‘you can’t sit at our table’.

Some women did appear to feel cheated by the inevitable changes that success brought these women. It was like they were friends but one found fame and moved on while one was left behind feeling stupid and frumpy and unable to afford the finer things in life. Yet they were never friends. A follower is just that. You may feel like you know these people but you are usually just a casual observer. There is a sense of disconnection between the affluence of the middle-class London lives of these women and what ‘real’ women are experiencing. Somehow the balance between slightly aspirational and totally unattainable has tipped too far for some.

Social media involved in ‘making women unhappy’ shocker!

Why is it that we torture ourselves with things that make us unhappy? It has been widely shared that Facebook (in particular) can make you lonely/depressed/unhappy/isolated. There is an unfollow button if you don’t like what you see. It can feel cliquey when you follow people who are friends and you see them going to parties and events together and getting goodie bags and freebies. But you don’t have to look. Whose responsibility is it to protect you from the envy or dissatisfaction? I think you’ll find it’s your own. You have a choice. You can choose to walk away and you can choose how you react to what you see. If it irks you so much, what does that say about your life? Are you happy with it or unhappy? Is this about them or you?

Social media is a fabulously seductive, inspiring, creative, wonderful, connecting place. But in terms of mental health it has a dark side too. You need to look at it with one eye open, so to speak. Protect yourself. Remember that it is curated. It is a business for some. They need to keep up certain standards (although I would argue there is plenty of imperfection on their feeds too – look and you’ll see imperfect bodies, messy kitchen drawers, destructive toddlers). I’m sure they have made mistakes, maybe choosing a brand who jars a little with their image or writing content that is just a bit flat. Haven’t we all made errors? Do you always say exactly the right thing, wear the right outfit, eat the right things? Would you want those choices torn apart on Mumsnet?

Comparison is the thief of joy and social media is made for comparisons. But if you can’t see that it all isn’t real, then you are very likely to be adversely affected by a lot of scrolling on Insta. Are any of our feeds real? If I am taking a pic, I style it up (badly, usually). I can’t do flat lays to save my life, but I will move mounds of washing out of the way for a better shot. I choose the cutest pics of my kids and a flattering angle for my mum tum. Rightly or wrongly, I like to show a slightly better version of myself. We all do. It’s not at the expense of the more real posts – I document our difficulties regularly too.

I also know when to step away.

Do you? (It’s waaaaay before you start commenting on the physical appearance of other people’s children on a Mumsnet thread, btw)

 

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